PC Lock (Using Mouse)

PC Lock (Using Mouse)

Hi,

Interesting try it out.

As we all are getting lazier day by day, this mail promotes laziness to the core! Generally we have problems in pressing Alt+Ctrl+Del or Windows+L to lock our PCs; hence it would be better if we could do that by the click of a mouse. Here’s how to do it :

1. Right click an empty spot on the desktop, point to New and click Shortcut.
2. In the Create Shortcut dialog box, copy the following into the ‘Type the location’ of the item text box:
"rundll32 user32.dll,LockWorkStation" remove quotes while typing.
3. Click Next.
4. In "Type a name for this shortcut", type LOCK and Click Finish
5. Now just double click on the icon, your desktop will be locked.

Be lazy..…Think crazy….

Advertisements

Issue: Unable to uninstall: assembly is required by one or more applications” Windows Installer error message when try to remove an assembly from the Global Assembly Cache (GAC) by using the Gacutil.exe tool

Unable to uninstall: assembly is required by one or more applications" Windows Installer error message when try to remove an assembly from the Global Assembly Cache (GAC) by using the Gacutil.exe tool

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/873195

Important This article contains information about how to modify the registry. Make sure that you back up the registry before you modify it. Make sure that you know how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up, restore, and modify the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

322756 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322756/ ) How to back up and restore the registry in Windows

Expand all | Collapse all

SYMPTOMS

When you try to remove an assembly from the Global Assembly Cache (GAC) by using…

When you try to remove an assembly from the Global Assembly Cache (GAC) by using the Gactutil /u command at a command prompt, you may receive the following Microsoft Windows Installer error message:

Unable to uninstall: assembly is required by one or more applications.

Back to the top

WORKAROUND

Warning Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by u…

Warning Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall the operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.

To work around this problem, examine the list of values for the following subkeys in Registry Editor:

  • HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftInstallerAssembliesGlobal
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareClassesInstallerAssembliesGlobal //For me it worked.

If the value for the <Assembly Full Name> entry is a Windows Installer descriptor, delete the <Assembly Full Name> entry. For example, the value might be a cryptic REG_MULTI_SZ entry that resembles the following:

=ysgSC6wx9uiD1dqmmjW>m$!GP^D’A@?z}gn3}lta

Note You must delete the <Assembly Full Name> entry. Do not just clear the value of the <Assembly Full Name> entry.

Back to the top

MORE INFORMATION

Windows Installer is a probable source of the erroneous registry entry that bloc…

Windows Installer is a probable source of the erroneous registry entry that blocks the Global Assembly Cache tool (Gacutil.exe) from uninstalling the assemblies. Gacutil.exe itself does not read from or write to the registry, but it starts the utilities that search for the Windows Installer references in the registry.

Gacutil.exe cannot override Windows Installer reference counts. Several possible causes of conflict exist between Windows Installer and Gacutil.exe. If you use Windows Installer to install an assembly in the GAC, Gacutil.exe may not be able to remove the assembly.

How to compare binary files (two DLLs)

http://www.prestosoft.com/edp_tutorial_bas3.asp

Tool name: ExamDiff Pro

Tutorial Description: This tutorial describes how to compare binary files, and discusses various binary file comparison options.

View video demonstration

Steps:

1. Open ExamDiff Pro and select the Files option in the Compare dialog. Then select two binary files to compare, such as two DLLs.

2. By default, ExamDiff Pro automatically determines whether files are text or binary. The program can automatically recognize text files encoded in ASCII (ANSI), UTF-8, and UTF-16 (both little and big endian) formats (UTF-16 files are detected by byte order marks — 0xFFFE for little endian and 0xFEFF for big endian). If none of these four encodings are detected, ExamDiff Pro will treat files as binary files. Alternatively, you can select Treat text files as binary in Options | Compare.

3. Click Compare. You will get a message similar to this:

4. Now click Show Details.

5. Let’s try out some binary comparison options. Press Ctrl-J or click on the Options toolbar button to open the Options dialog, and navigate to the Dir Comparison page.

6. The first option we will examine is Comparison block size. By default, this is set to 1 byte, which provides the most accurate binary comparison. However, for large file comparison may take such a long time that it makes sense to sacrifice some precision for better performance. Let’s change it to 2 bytes:

You can see that we get a less-detailed comparison report (e.g. the numbers of differences is now 910 versus 1526 when we used 1-byte blocks) but this result was achieved faster that the first one.

7. The next options, Number of bytes per line, Byte format, Character set, and External binary editor are self-explanatory and well-documented in the online Help.

8. One more thing: if, after comparing two text files, you want to see the results of their binary comparison, you can use the Files | Toggle Text/Binary Comparison menu command, or the Toggle Text/Binary Comparison toolbar button . (If you can’t find the Toggle Text/Binary Comparison toolbar button on your ExamDiff Pro toolbar, you may have to customize your toolbar, as demonstrated in Basic Tutorial #2, Step 6.)